“The Meaning of Christ's Death”

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“The Meaning of Christ's Death”

Post by Romans » Mon Dec 11, 2017 3:28 pm

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“The Meaning of Christ's Death” by Romans

Before I say anything else, there is a particular book that I have used in the preparation for many of these Discussions. I have endorsed it before, and I want to do that again tonight. As I was preparing these Notes this morning and afternoon, I was bowled over by the work that went into the outline that I used from the book. The book is called, The World's Bible Handbook by Robert T. Boyd. Including the index, it is a 792 page book, and it is probably the most comprehensive Study Tool I own. You can buy it used on Amazon for as little as $3.99! (Plus, of course, shipping and handling.)

Amazon also sells this book under an alternate title, “Varsity's Bible Handbook.” The cover is different, the book is slightly smaller, but the text is identical. I have been able to verify this because I own both versions. It also sells in the same very inexpensive price range. It is hard for me to imagine how much time it took this one author, a minister with decades of pastoral experience, to write this book. He apparently kept incredible notes from his sermons, and incorporated them into the endless lists and wonderful insights contained in this book. I your spouse or family member needs a hint as to what to buy you for Christmas, or you want to give a really good gift to yourself, I highly recommend this book!

I give Robert T. Boyd full credit for the outline that I used in the preparation of tonight's Discussion, “The Meaning of Christ's Death.”

You may be wondering as Christmas is upon us, and we are celebrating the birth of Christ, why would I
choose a topic that might seem to be better suited for the Spring of the year when we commemorate Jesus' Death and Resurrection? Well, we read in Luke's Account, details of what was said when Jesus was still a baby. Beginning in Luke 2:25, we read: “And, behold, there was a man in Jerusalem, whose name was Simeon; and the same man was just and devout, waiting for the consolation of Israel: and the Holy Ghost was upon him. And it was revealed unto him by the Holy Ghost, that he should not see death, before he had seen the Lord's Christ...

“And he came by the Spirit into the temple: and when the parents brought in the child Jesus, to do for him after the custom of the law, Then took he him up in his arms, and blessed God, and said, Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace, according to thy word: For mine eyes have seen thy salvation, Which thou hast prepared before the face of all people;” Christianity is often criticized as being an “exclusive Religion,” that caters only to a select and limited group. Even Simeon, before Jesus could walk or talk, knew that criticism was groundless, declaring that Jesus' coming was for “all people.”

Jesus came to this earth to bring Salvation to this world by taking the punishment for sin by dying for the sins committed by every man, woman and child on the planet. That Salvation could only be brought about by His Sacrificial Death. And isn't it true that that is why His birth is celebrated at all? We have buried the reason for His Coming under all the shiny objects that materialism can throw at us to distract us from that reason. But as Simeon said as he held the infant Jesus in his arms, “Mine eyes have seen Thy Salvation... prepared before the face of all people.”

What I plan to do tonight is cite many of the verses that appear in Robert Boyd's list, while also supplementing additional relevant verses. There will be some comment for a few verses, but for the most part I will just share the verses that support the verses' Headers. Next week I plan to go back over many of tonight's verses, but there will be significant commentary on each one, putting to full use some of the commentaries that I have shared with you in previous Discussions.

So let's examine, and come to a better understanding of “The Meaning of Christ's Death.”

Let's understand first that Jesus' Death was predetermined:
Acts 2:22: Peter proclaimed to the Jerusalem crowd who gathered to observe Pentecost: “Ye men of Israel, hear these words; Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God among you by miracles and wonders and signs, which God did by him in the midst of you, as ye yourselves also know: Him, being delivered by the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God, ye have taken, and by wicked hands have crucified and slain:”

Then, Peter, again, wrote in his first epistle 1 Peter 1:18: “Forasmuch as ye know that ye were not redeemed with corruptible things, as silver and gold, from your vain conversation received by tradition from your fathers; But with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot: Who verily was foreordained before the foundation of the world, but was manifest in these last times for you.”

Paul wrote in 1 Corinthians 15:3: “For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures;” And then we read in Revelation 13:8, Jesus being referred to as “... the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.”

Another aspect of Jesus' Death that we must never overlook or diminish in our thinking is that it was voluntary: John 10:1: “Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life, that I might take it again. No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This commandment have I received of my Father.”

In the Garden of Gethsemene, after the mob arrived to arrest Him, and Peter cut off Malchus' ear, Jesus, Himself, said beginning in Matthew 26:52: “Then said Jesus unto him, Put up again thy sword into his place: for all they that take the sword shall perish with the sword. Thinkest thou that I cannot now pray to my Father, and he shall presently give me more than twelve legions of angels? But how then shall the scriptures be fulfilled, that thus it must be?”

Jesus was a willing participant in His crucifixion. We read His words in John 10:17-18: “Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life, that I might take it again. No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself.”

Scripture tells us that Jesus' Death was sacrificial:
John the Baptist clearly identified Jesus as a sacrificial lamb in John 1:29: “The next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.”
For centuries, Israel went through the motions of sacrificing the Passover Lamb without ever applying its significance to what the Messiah would experience when He arrived.

It is amazing to realize that at the very time that Jesus was bleeding out as He was hanging there, nailed to the cross, His fellow-countrymen, who were not a part of the crowd that was there at His crucifixion, was sacrificing lambs for that evening's Passover celebration. And they missed it. Completely. The original Passover Lambs blood dripped down the wooden frames of the doors, while Jesus' blood ran down the wood of the cross. That picture, and the significance of Jesus' death was not lost to the Apostle Paul. He wrote in the second part of 1 Corinthians 5:7: “Christ our Passover is sacrificed for us:”

Jesus' Death was vicarious: (Vicarious, as Defined by the Online Merriam-Webster Dictionary: “performed or suffered by one person as a substitute for another or to the benefit or advantage of another.” Sometimes you hear of a parent living vicariously through their son or daughter as they sign them up for various sports teams or beauty pageants. Well, Jesus' death was vicarious in that He took the full punishment that we brought on ourselves. God poured out His full Righteous wrath on His Son as He was nailed to the cross. Let's see a few Scriptures that demonstrate that:

The first one I want to highlight is found in Paul's writings: We read in 2 Corinthians 5:21: “For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.”

This is not a verse that you read without substantial thought. It is not a verse that you read without deep reflection. For He {the Father} made Him {Jesus} to BE SIN for us. How much meditation value is there in just those nine words? Christ indeed was the Lamb of God sent to take away the sin of the world, but He took sin away by becoming sin so that when the Father saw Him, and poured out His Wrath on Him, He both satisfied and exhausted His Righteous Judgment on Jesus such that we could be completely forgiven, our sins having been both paid for in full and utterly abolished.

1 Peter 3:18: “For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:”

Galatians 2:20: “I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me.”

Referring to Jesus, we read in Romans 4:25: “Who was delivered for our offences, and was raised again for our justification.”

Most of us are familiar with the prophecy found in the first part of Isaiah 53:10: “Yet it pleased the LORD to bruise him; he hath put him to grief: when thou shalt make his soul an offering for sin.”

We read in Hebrews 9:13: “For if the blood of bulls and of goats, and the ashes of an heifer sprinkling the unclean, sanctifieth to the purifying of the flesh: How much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead works to serve the living God?”

And again in Hebrews 9:26: “For then must he often have suffered since the foundation of the world: but now once in the end of the world hath he appeared to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself.”

Jesus Death was expiatory: (Expiatory, as defined by the Online Merriam-Webster's dictionary: to make obsolete, or put an end to. To extinguish.) Now what does this term “expiatory” have to do with Jesus Death? Example: E-mail has expiated having to wait for days for a correspondent to receive a letter from you. In like manner, the Sacrificial Death of Jesus Christ has expiated the sentence of death that we incurred for our disobedience and rebellion against the Commands of God.

Romans 5:8: “But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him.
For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life.”

Christ's Death was Propitiatory: (Propitiatory, as defined by the Online Merriam Websters dictionary: “to gain or regain the favor or goodwill of...” Synonyms include “appease” and “pacify”)

1 John 2:1: “My little children, these things write I unto you, that ye sin not. And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous: And he is the propitiation for our sins: and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world.”

1 John 4:10: “Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.”

Romans 3:25: “Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation through faith in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God.”

Jesus Death was Redemptive: (In the Greco/Roman world, redemption was when someone intervened on behalf of a slave, and bought his or her freedom).
We read Galatians 4:4: “But when the fulness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law, To redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.”

We also read in Acts 20:28: “Take heed therefore unto yourselves, and to all the flock, over the which the Holy Ghost hath made you overseers, to feed the church of God, which he hath purchased with his own blood.”

Jesus Death was substitutionary:
1 Peter 2:24: “Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed.”

2 Corinthians 5:21: “For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.”

Let's take Jesus' Death in Perspective and examine it. When we do that, we see that it was for the whole world:

1 John 2:2: “And he is the propitiation for our sins:” there is that word again, indicating that he satisfied the demands of justice to a righteous God, but the Verse goes on to say, “and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world.”

In this next verse, we read Jesus' sacrifice for us using a term for which we need no dictionary definition:
1 Timothy 2:6: “Who gave himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time.”

Here again we read John the Baptist's words with a different focus: John 1:29: “Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.”

Jesus Death was for each individual:
Hebrews 2:9: “But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.”

Let's take a look at the Saving Power of the Cross:
Romans 5:6: “For when we were yet without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly. For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: yet peradventure for a good man some would even dare to die. But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.”

1 Timothy 1:15: “This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners;”

1 Peter 3:18: “For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:”

Jesus' Death was for all members of the Body of Christ, everywhere:
Ephesians 5:25: “Husbands, love your wives, even as Christ also loved the church, and gave himself for it; That he might sanctify and cleanse it with the washing of water by the word, That he might present it to himself a glorious church, not having spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing; but that it should be holy and without blemish.”

1 Timothy 4:10: “For therefore we both labour and suffer reproach, because we trust in the living God, who is the Saviour of all men, specially of those that believe.”

Jesus' Death draws men to Him:
John 12:32: “And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all men unto me.”

Sin is addressed by the Cross in 5 ways: 1.) Sin is forgiven at the Cross; 2.) Sin is removed by the Cross; 3.) Sin is blotted out by the Cross; 4.) Sin is buried by the Cross, and, 5.) Because of the Cross, sin is remembered no more. Let's focus on each of the effect one at a time:

First, Sin is forgiven at the Cross:
Ephesians 1:7: “In whom we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of his grace.”

Romans 4:7: “Blessed are they whose iniquities are forgiven, and whose sins are covered.”

Second, Sin is removed by the Cross:
Psalms 103:12: “As far as the east is from the west, so far hath he removed our transgressions from us.”

Third, Sin is blotted out by the Cross:
Isaiah 44:22: “I have blotted out, as a thick cloud, thy transgressions, and, as a cloud, thy sins: return unto me; for I have redeemed thee.”

Fourth, Sin is buried by the Cross:
Micah 7:19: “He will turn again, he will have compassion upon us; he will subdue our iniquities; and thou wilt cast all their sins into the depths of the sea.”

Fifth, Sin is remembered no more:
Hebrews 10:16: “This is the covenant that I will make with them after those days, saith the Lord, I will put my laws into their hearts, and in their minds will I write them; And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more.”

But after all of that, if all that happened was the complete wiping away of our sins, rendering us as clean slates, could we at the point be able to inherit the Kingdom? What about the element of Righteousness? Jesus clearly stated in His Sermon on the Mount in Matthew 5:20: “For I say unto you, That except your righteousness shall exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, ye shall in no case enter into the kingdom of heaven.”

The Scribes and Pharisees were repeatedly identified by Jesus as hypocrites. Jesus told the chief priests and the elders flat out in Matthew 21:31: “Verily I say unto you, That the publicans and the harlots go into the kingdom of God before you.” And what of us? If only our sins are removed, can we depend on our own righteousness to grant us entrance into the Kingdom?

What does Scripture tell us in regard to our righteousness?
We read in Isaiah 64:6: “... all our righteousnesses are as filthy rags...”

And so where and what is the remedy? The Cross abolished and eradicated our sins, but our righteousness is as filthy rags...

And that is where God intervenes to fill the next gap that we are powerless to fill. Because of the Cross, the Righteousness of Christ is imputed (or, assigned) to us. Not only does God fully accept the punishment Jesus endured for our sins, He also fully accepts Jesus' Righteousness being applied to our accounts, as if it is ours! But with God... there are no “if's” where we are concerned. When He sees us, He sees us with the Righteousness of Christ.

Let me go back to a verse I quoted earlier, and shift the focus to our righteousness. In the verse which spoke of Jesus becoming sin for us, we read in its entirety, “For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him” (2 Corinthians 5:21). Notice that, Jesus was made sin, the we might be made the righteousness of God in Him! THAT is how God sees those who accepted the Sacrifice of Jesus Christ, and applied His Sacrifice to the penalty of their sins. We are made the Righteousness of God through Christ!

Notice: Romans 3:25: “Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation through faith in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God; To declare, I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus. Where is boasting then? It is excluded. By what law? of works? Nay: but by the law of faith. Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith without the deeds of the law.”

There is nothing we do... there is nothing we can do to earn Salvation. There is nothing we can boast about. The forgiveness of our sins, and the application of Jesus' Righteousness to our accounts is absolutely undeserved and unmerited. If we could live a million lifetimes, we could not earn what God freely gives us. They are all Gifts from God.

Notice what we find in Romans 4:6: “Even as David also describeth the blessedness of the man, unto whom God imputeth righteousness without works, Saying, Blessed are they whose iniquities are forgiven, and whose sins are covered. Blessed is the man to whom the Lord will not impute sin.”

Because of the Cross, Grace is poured out on all those who accept it:
Romans 5:17: “For if by one man's offence death reigned by one; much more they which receive abundance of grace and of the gift of righteousness shall reign in life by one, Jesus Christ.)”
Ephesians 2:7: “That in the ages to come he might shew the exceeding riches of his grace in his kindness toward us through Christ Jesus.”

Because of the Cross, the distance between God and man in annihilated:
Ephesians 2:13: “But now in Christ Jesus ye who sometimes were far off are made nigh by the blood of Christ.”

But then, because of the Cross, once distance is annihilated, reconciliation with God is possible:
Romans 5:10: “For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life.”

Because of the Cross, redemption from the curse of the Law is secured:
Galatians 3:13: “Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us:”

Because of the Cross, justification from guilt is provided:
Romans 5:9: “Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him.”

And then, because of the Cross, forgiveness is secured:
Ephesians 1:7: “In whom we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of his grace;”

Because of the Cross, sonship is furnished:
Galatians 4:3: “Even so we, when we were children, were in bondage under the elements of the world:
But when the fulness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law, To redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.”

Notice also what we read in 1 John 3:2: “Beloved, now are we the sons of God, and it doth not yet appear what we shall be: but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him; for we shall see him as he is.”

Because of the Cross, cleansing from all sin is provided:
1 John 1:7: “But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin. If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.”

Because of the Cross, the power of sin is potentially nullified:
This is interesting. Why did Mr. Boyd, the author of this Outline in his World's Bible Handbook, say that “the power of sin is potentially nullified”? Let's read the verses he chose to explain his choice of words: Romans 6:6-13: “Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin. For he that is dead is freed from sin. Now if we be dead with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with him: Knowing that Christ being raised from the dead dieth no more; death hath no more dominion over him...

“For in that he died, he died unto sin once: but in that he liveth, he liveth unto God. Likewise reckon ye also yourselves to be dead indeed unto sin, but alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord. Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body, that ye should obey it in the lusts thereof. Neither yield ye your members as instruments of unrighteousness unto sin : but yield yourselves unto God, as those that are alive from the dead, and your members as instruments of righteousness unto God.”

Paul admonishes us to not “yield ye your members as instruments of unrighteousness unto sin...” It is a daily choice to obey God. And it is a daily warfare against temptation. Notice Luke 9:23: “And he said to them all, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow me.” That is why I agree with Mr. Boyd's saying that because of the Cross, “the power of sin is potentially nullified.” But we must arm ourselves against it as the enemy that it is. That is where the putting on of the “whole armour of God” comes in. Yes, forgiveness is provided, righteousness is imputed and Grace is freely given. We cannot earn any of those.

The Christian life is a journey... a walk that merely begins with forgiveness of sin, and imputation of righteousness, and the pouring out of Grace upon us. Once we start, we must continue that walk. We read in 1 John 1:7: “But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin.”

Jesus cleanses us from sin, present tense and continually. But, redemption is not like getting your parting ticket validated. Once that ticket is punched, you stick it in your pocket and forget about it. Notice John 8:31: “Then said Jesus to those Jews which believed on him, If ye continue in my word, then are ye my disciples indeed.” To continue in His Word is to walk in Faith, to walk in the Light, to resist Satan's temptations, and to reject the world and its ways. Faith without works is dead, as James wrote in James 2:20. There are things we do as Christians, not to earn Salvation and Eternal Life, but in response to being their undeserving recipients. We read in Ephesians 2:10: “For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them.”

Notice this scenario that Jesus presented which sheds more light on what Christians do, and how they are accepted by God. Jesus said in beginning in Matthew 25:31: “When the Son of man shall come in his glory, and all the holy angels with him, then shall he sit upon the throne of his glory: And before him shall be gathered all nations: and he shall separate them one from another, as a shepherd divideth his sheep from the goats: And he shall set the sheep on his right hand, but the goats on the left.
Then shall the King say unto them on his right hand, Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world:” Let's stop right there!

Do you remember what we read in Romans 4:6: “Even as David also describeth the blessedness of the man, unto whom God imputeth righteousness without works...” Jesus said “Come ye blessed of my Father, inherit the Kingdom... ” These individuals are called blessed, but they do not boast of works. Jesus continues: “For I was an hungred, and ye gave me meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I was a stranger, and ye took me in: Naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me...

“Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.”

These individuals do not brag about all the good works they did in His Name to earn Salvation. In fact, when Jesus tells them all that they did, and how it was accepted by God, they seem startled that it was received the way it was. They didn't deny doing it. They did all these things, but they did them in love, they did them in the spirit of selfless service seeking nothing in return, and they did them as a result of and in response to the Salvation that was given them as a Gift, and not in order to earn that Salvation.

Contrast activities and attitudes of the individuals named above, with what we find in
or use what they had done as a bargaining chip to force God's hand to allow them to enter into the Kingdom. No... it is to the braggarts that Jesus says, “I never knew you.”

The Cross accomplished what we could never do on our own. Because of the Cross, condemnation is forever removed: We read in Romans 8:1: “There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death. For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:”

Romans 8:33: “Who shall lay any thing to the charge of God's elect? It is God that justifieth. Who is he that condemneth? It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us.”

And lastly, because of the Cross, the fear of death is abolished:
Hebrews 2:14: “Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil; And deliver them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage.”

1 Corinthians 15:20: “But now is Christ risen from the dead, and become the firstfruits of them that slept. For since by man came death, by man came also the resurrection of the dead. For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive. But every man in his own order: Christ the firstfruits; afterward they that are Christ's at his coming.”

1 Corinthians 15:54: “So when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal shall have put on immortality, then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory. O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory? The sting of death is sin; and the strength of sin is the law. But thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. Therefore, my beloved brethren, be ye stedfast, unmoveable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your labour is not in vain in the Lord.”

Unlike every other leader, good or evil, that people have rallied behind and followed, the Death of Jesus Christ was not the end of Him, or the end of God's Plan of Salvation. We were justified in God's sight by the blood of Jesus Christ that He shed for us on the Cross. Three days later, Jesus was resurrected to Everlasting Life. And that Resurrection has also has an intrinsically important part in our Salvation as well. When we started this Evening, one of the first Scriptures I quoted was from the Book of Romans.

Let me quote it, again, but this time, focus on one particular part that may have escaped your notice:
Beginning in Romans 5:8: “But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him. For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life.”

Yes. This is the Christmas Season. Christians all over the world will be celebrating the birth of the Savior of the World. Tonight, I shared with you the why's and the how's, the prophetic foundations and the fulfillment of those prophecies, all of which explain WHY the birth of Jesus Christ is worthy of celebration.

This concludes this Evening's Discussion, “The Meaning of Christ's Death.”

This Discussion was originally presented “live” on December 6th, 2017

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